“ My parents have been married for over 30 years and I have been raised in their love. My mother told me my father used to send her a handwritten love letter every day when they were young in Somalia and sometimes twice a day when he missed her something bad. Love is having babies and fleeing a country in war together. It is being scared and being brave anyway. It is missing each other and always being friends. My parent’s love taught me that you need more than beautiful words for love to survive. Love is hard work, it is a commitment every day, it is doing what is necessary to make sure the other person is ok. My father somehow took care of a family of 12+ on a taxi cab driver’s salary and studied by a lamp’s light every night. My mother raised 10 children in a country hostile to their very existence with nothing but pure wit and strength. So I learned early on that love must manifest in actions. My favorite memory of them is how my mother would wait to eat until my father came home every day and them sitting together just laughing, talking, and loving. One time, my father took my mother’s hand and looked at us sitting around the table and told us, ‘you know, I love this woman. She is my best friend.’ And the way my mother still looks at my father, I know he’s not the only one who feels that way. ”

—    Yasmin Mohamed Yonis, in an interview for the Black Love Project (via ethiopienne)

(via nica-nopal)

torogozando:

Fateh Moudarres | Syria 

Untitled mixed media on paper | 27x17cm | Atassi Gallery Collection, courtesy of Atassi Gallery

Fateh Moudarres (1922-1999) is widely considered to be one of Syria and the Arab world’s seminal modernists. The bold singularity of his representational language was engaged with mythology, religion and popular lore as well as his deep political
engagement. A stubborn iconoclast and tireless insurgent, he was a pivotal figure for generations of artists in Syria, he said of his style: «It looks childish, but it is not childish. In my paintings one can see, how much I love human beings, in my art I stand near them, when the power of fate and oppressive structures beset them.» In addition to visual arts, Moudarres was also a poet and writer. The exhibition includes paintings that mark a milestone in his practice, dating back to the 1960s,
especially 1967 – the year of the defeat of the Arab armies in the war with Israel. The series of drawings include his infamous portrait of internationally-acclaimed Syrian poet Adonis who was a close accomplice of Moudarres. They underline at once the irreverent versatility of his talent and the coherence of his language.Presented by Atassi Gallery, Damascus, Syria - x

(via ojo-de-venado)

It is never late to ask yourself “Am I ready to change my life, am I ready to change myself?”. However old we are, whatever we went through, it is always possible to reborn. If each day is a copy of the last one, what a pity! Every breath is a chance to reborn. But to reborn into a new life, you have to die before dying.

—    Shams-e-Tabrizi (Alaihi Rahma)

(via ojo-de-venado)